WSKY 1230AM WDZY1290AM/103.3FM KWDF 840AM/99.7FM 03/10/2018

Our first guest is David Sturt New York Times bestselling Author and Workplace Leadership Expert discusses: The subjects:

What’s The Secret Of A Great Workplace?

Learning the Do’s and the and Don’ts of Showing Appreciation in the Workplace

And What Employees Want Most.

While not every workplace may be as extreme as depicted in any given episode of The Office – every place of business in America is likely in need of some sort of a makeover. And while appreciation is everywhere – from statues erected of people who impacted our world, to buildings and parks named after community leaders – we do not see enough appreciation in the one place where it is needed most: at work.  A recent study proves that appreciation and recognition is the number one thing employees say their managers could do to inspire great work. When employees participate in all three aspects of recognition moments—meaning they give recognition, receive recognition, and observe recognition—companies witness a 591% increase of employees who say they are engaged.

 

 

Our second guest is Chief of Cardiology Clyde Yancy, MD, MSc,  he discusses the latest heart research, including the digital future of Heart Disease, what you and your family need to know about hypertension and the best (and easiest) ways to prevent heart disease.

Heart disease remains the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States.  However, you can take steps to halt its progress. The key is to know your risk factors and modify the ones you can. This can both lengthen and improve the quality of your life. Among the many different kinds of heart disease, millions of Americans are living with “heart failure” or heart muscle disorder—the inability of the heart to provide adequate blood supply and oxygen to the body. The goal of the highly skilled team of cardiologists and cardiac surgeons at the Center for Heart Failure at The Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute at Northwestern Memorial Hospital is to provide progressive strategies to diagnose, treat and stabilize heart failure, while improving your overall quality of life. The clinical team at Northwestern Medicine’s Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute works with referring physicians to give patients with heart failure the best outcomes possible—even those patients with unique cases.

Clyde W. Yancy, MD, MSc is Chief of Cardiology at Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, and Associate Director of the Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. He holds the Magerstadt Endowed Professor of Medicine Chair and also holds an appointment as Professor of Medical Social Sciences.  He concurrently serves as Vice-Dean of Diversity & Inclusion, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine. For more information please visit www.nm.org/radio

W4Cy & W4VET 3/08/2018

Our first guest is Mike Scultz, First-Time Team USA & Paralympic Snowboarder, will Share Advice to Accomplish Goals. With the Paralympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018  March 9th through the March 18th. Kellogg’s® one of the Sponsors is continuing its celebration of what inspires people to get up each morning, enjoy breakfast and embrace the potential of a new day with a team of inspiring athletes. After an injury resulted in the amputation of his leg in 2008, U.S. national Paralympic snowboard champion Mike Schultz knows that we only have so much energy to put toward something, so he packs his schedule to make sure he gets the most out of every day. He focuses on the things he can control – like building his business, spending time with his family and training for competition.

Mike Schultz (Paralympic Boardercross) has been a lifetime enthusiast of action sports. When a snowmobile accident during a professional competition in 2008 cost him his left leg above the knee, there was only one thing for Mike to do – find a way to continue competing in sports at a high level. To do this, he had to design himself a better leg. Only seven months after his accident, Schultz went on to compete in his first Moto event post injury and won a silver medal at the 2009 Summer X Games in Adaptive Motocross on a prosthetic leg he designed. It was after this that Mike realized the need for advancements in high impact adaptive sports prosthetic’s and founded his own company in July 2010. Currently more than 100 wounded soldiers, action sport athletes and amputees wanting to return to an active lifestyle are using Mike’s prosthetic equipment. In 2010, Schultz was inducted into the Athletes with Disabilities Network Hall of Fame in the U.S.

 

 

Our next guest is David Sturt New York Times bestselling Author and Workplace Leadership Expert discusses: The subjects:

What’s The Secret Of A Great Workplace?

Learning the Do’s and the and Don’ts of Showing Appreciation in the Workplace

And What Employees Want Most.

While not every workplace may be as extreme as depicted in any given episode of The Office – every place of business in America is likely in need of some sort of a makeover. And while appreciation is everywhere – from statues erected of people who impacted our world, to buildings and parks named after community leaders – we do not see enough appreciation in the one place where it is needed most: at work.  A recent study proves that appreciation and recognition is the number one thing employees say their managers could do to inspire great work. When employees participate in all three aspects of recognition moments—meaning they give recognition, receive recognition, and observe recognition—companies witness a 591% increase of employees who say they are engaged.

 

Our next guests are Dr. Michael Callaghan, physician who treats hemophilia A with factor VIII inhibitors and patient Ken, a 50-year-old living with hemophilia A with factor VIII inhibitors.

Bleeding Disorders Awareness Month is (March), and hematologist Dr. Michael Callaghan talks about why this new medicine is an important advancement and what it could mean for people who have hemophilia A with inhibitors. Dr. Callaghan is joined by Ken – a 50-year-old who was diagnosed at age 5 and who received the medicine in a clinical study – who can share his inspirational story.

 

 

Our last guest is Executive Director of the DHS Michael “Mick” McKeown discusses is how the agency is committed to combating human trafficking and will give tips on what the indicators are and what to do if you suspect something. As DHS Executive Director, Mr. McKeown oversees the HSAC and its 40 Council members as well as the ongoing policy work of the subcommittees. He also leads the Blue Campaign which heightens the public’s familiarity with human trafficking and its identifiers. Mr. McKeown also heads the “If You See Something, Say Something™” campaign which raises public awareness on the indicators of terrorism and terrorism related crimes and how to recognize them.  Mr. McKeown graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Holy Family University and received his master’s degree in Political Management at George Washington University.

 Human trafficking is a horrific crime that strips people of their basic rights. It uses use of force, fraud, or coercion to obtain some type of forced labor or commercial sex act. Human trafficking happens in every state in the U.S., in rural areas, major cities and suburbs. Human trafficking doesn’t discriminate.

Common indicators of human trafficking may include, lack of freedom of movement, avoiding eye contact and interaction with others, signs of malnourished, poor hygiene, fatigue, sleep deprivation, untreated illness, injuries, and/or unusual behavior, loss of control over or possession of money or ID.  Each indicator alone may not necessarily mean a person is being trafficked. For more information please visit www.dhs.gov

If you suspect human trafficking, call the Homeland Security Investigations tip line at 1-866-DHS-2-ICE (1-866-347-2423) or the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888 

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